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Validation of the Taiwanese version of the Epilepsy Surgery Satisfaction Questionnaire (Tw-ESSQ-19)

  • Po-Tso Lin
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Samuel Wiebe
    Affiliations
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

    Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

    Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

    O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
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  • Chien-Chen Chou
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Yi-Jiun Lu
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Chun-Fu Lin
    Affiliations
    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Sanford P.C. Hsu
    Affiliations
    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Cheng-Chia Lee
    Affiliations
    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Hsiang-Yu Yu
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No. 201, Sec. 2 Shih-Pai Road, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    Institute of Brain Science, Brain Research Center, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan

    School of Medicine, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei, Taiwan
    Search for articles by this author

      Highlights

      • An instrument to assess epilepsy surgery satisfaction is needed in Mandarin world.
      • The Mandarin version of the ESSQ-19 is valid for epilepsy surgery satisfaction.
      • Tw-ESSQ-19 distinguishes among patients with different clinical characteristics.

      Abstract

      Objective

      Satisfaction with epilepsy surgery in Mandarin-speaking countries remains unknown. We aimed to validate in our Taiwanese patients an existing instrument to measure patient satisfaction with epilepsy surgery, the 19-item Epilepsy Surgery Satisfaction Questionnaire (ESSQ-19).

      Methods

      Consecutive patients with epilepsy who received epilepsy surgery one year earlier in Taipei Veterans General Hospital were recruited and provided clinical and demographic data. The Mandarin version of the ESSQ-19 for the Taiwanese population and eight other questionnaires were completed to assess construct validity. To evaluate the validity and reliability of the tool, the data were analyzed by confirmatory factor analysis, Spearman’s rank correlation, and internal consistency analysis.

      Results

      The study involved 120 patients (70 F/50 M, median age 35 years [IQR = 28–41]). The mean summary score (±SD) of the Tw-ESSQ-19 was 82.5 ± 14.5. The mean scores of the four domains were 90.3 ± 15.4 (surgical complications), 83.2 ± 16.7 (seizure control), 80.1 ± 17.3 (recovery from surgery), and 76.6 ± 18.3 (psychosocial functioning). The questionnaire was shown to have good construct validity with satisfactory goodness-of-fit of the data (standardized root mean square residual = 0.0492; comparative fit index = 0.946). It also demonstrated good discriminant validity (being seizure free [AUC 0.78; 95% CI 0.68–0.89], endorsing depression [AUC 0.84; 95% CI 0.76–0.91], self-rating epilepsy as disabling [AUC 0.71; 95% CI 0.58–0.84], and self-rating epilepsy as severe [AUC 0.78; 95% CI 0.64–0.93]), high internal consistency in four domains (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.83–0.96), and no significant floor/ceiling effects of the summary score.

      Significance

      The Mandarin version of the ESSQ-19 adapted for the Taiwanese population is a reliable and valid self-reported questionnaire for assessing patient satisfaction with epilepsy surgery.

      Keywords

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